Category Archives: racism

Racism in the LGBT world

Now Is the Time to Start Talking About Racism in the LGBT Community

The LGBT community endorses — marriage equality for all — perhaps the next major issue to address: LGBT representation has been dominated by cisgender gay white men.
Gay black men like my husband experience racism as a “double-minority” in stores, clubs, and work. Our “Gayborhood” includes West Hollywood but is bereft of black and queer folks,

In the Huffington Post Ernest Owens (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ernest-owens looked at the problem that people of color are often portrayed as drag-ballroom performers or hyper-sexual eye-candy.

He goes on to say: “take the fight for marriage equality for example, where have people of color been individually called on to take up that fight? Who sets that agenda? And where are LGBT allies when it comes to the racial injustices we face outside of queer politics. When other human rights groups were at Ferguson or Baltimore — many LGBT organizations said nothing about the queer people of color who might have been afflicted”.

Yes, the black community has homophobic views. But the current LGBT movement lacks recognizing variety and sympathy for people of color in general. And this does NOT distract from other social causes we are trying to achieve.

As the Supreme Court consiiders marriage equality and perhaps ends the fight we should move on to the next LGBT movement which ismore diverse and colorful.

Because the constant recycling of Dan Savage and many other white, cisgender men like him turns off aspiring LGBT members of color to come out and align themselves within the movement.

That means more queer events fundraising not for white queer but, for example, black transgender atrocities or the “Undocuqueer” people of color denied citizenship.

As Owens says “It’s time to start addressing the racial setbacks in the current LGBT movement. If we don’t now, we are never going to obtain that pot of gold equality on the other side of the diverse rainbow”.

The Supreme Court, Marriage Equality and the Church

We are anxiously awaiting oral arguments this week, committed gay couples seeking the right to marry will take their case to the Supreme Court.

Religious groups are on their side, including my welcoming Unitarian Universalist Church, have signed briefs to legalize same-sex marriage.
The faith traditions supporting marriage equality are telling the court that religions, like American families, are diverse. Even some Bible-based faith communities have an inclusive attitude toward gay families and marriages.

This is another example of changes of public attitudes and then the law change. Before the Civil War, many Mormons and Southern Slavery for persons of African descent was justified by Bible interpretations. Then when slavery ended, then churches read Scripture to require segregation and to bar interracial relationships.

Inevitably, this overt discrimination was renounced with new readings of the Bible after landmark civil rights legislation in the 1960s. The Mormons abandoned formal racial segregation in 1978. Scripture rarely speaks with one voice about how to define civil marriage.

If the Supreme Court interprets the 14th Amendment to mean that states can’t exclude gay couples from civil marriage. I hope that churches which are adamantly opposed to same-sex marriageshow a tolerant path eventually.

With greater tolerance and acceptance of gay married couples, more religions will, slowly, modify doctrinal discourse to match social discourse — exactly the way they did for their previous disapproval of marriages between two people of different races.

Source:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/opinion/sunday/its-not-gay-marriage-vs-the-church-anymore.html?ref=todayspaper

Forcing Black Men Out of Society

The local chapter (BWMTSC) last night had another “Gabfest” or rap session with the topic of “White Priviledge” where we discussed covert and overt racism.
This latter topic came back to me a I found an analysis in The Times which showed that more than one in every six black men in the 24-to-54 age group has disappeared from civic life, mainly because they died young or are locked away in prison. in the white population, men and women are about equal in numbers.

This leads to lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, poverty for families and less stable communities. We have had 200 years of real and “virtual” slavery followed by the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, beginning in the 1970s.

Millions more are shut out of society, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. All black men and boys now have to fight the presumption of criminality from police, schools, and on the job.

In education, this starts very early in life sine black children are far more likely to be suspended from school — even from preschool — than white children. Later in life, criminal convictions for black men seeking employment were virtually impossible to overcome because convictions reinforced powerful, longstanding stereotypes. And still later, unarmed black men and boys are shot dead by the police show how the presumption of criminality, poverty and social isolation threatens lives every day in all corners of this country.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/opinion/sunday/forcing-black-men-out-of-society.html?ref=todayspaper

Forcing Black Men Out of Society

The local chapter (BWMTSC) last night had another “Gabfest” or rap session with the topic of “White Priviledge” where we discussed covert and overt racism.
This latter topic came back to me a I found an analysis in The Times which showed that more than one in every six black men in the 24-to-54 age group has disappeared from civic life, mainly because they died young or are locked away in prison. in the white population, men and women are about equal in numbers.

This leads to lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, poverty for families and less stable communities. We have had 200 years of real and “virtual” slavery followed by the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, beginning in the 1970s.

Millions more are shut out of society, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. All black men and boys now have to fight the presumption of criminality from police, schools, and on the job.

In education, this starts very early in life sine black children are far more likely to be suspended from school — even from preschool — than white children. Later in life, criminal convictions for black men seeking employment were virtually impossible to overcome because convictions reinforced powerful, longstanding stereotypes. And still later, unarmed black men and boys are shot dead by the police show how the presumption of criminality, poverty and social isolation threatens lives every day in all corners of this country.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/opinion/sunday/forcing-black-men-out-of-society.html?ref=todayspaper

Richard Pryor, Murdered Black Men and Police Brutality

From Anthony Carter

When I began doing stand up comedy in 1999, I aspired to be as brilliant as
Richard Pryor.

Great comedy slams ideas together, questions the ridiculousness of humor
behavior, stares at what terrifies and points out how truly stupid and amazing
human beings can be.

Great artists force us to self reflect and offer us an opportunity to
restructure our lives, seek amends for awful decisions and examine new
solutions that require bravery and incredible vulnerability.

Blacks are being assaulted and murdered at an alarming rate.

We could use Mr. Pryor’s insight and incredible storytelling abilities to
illustrate what needs to be done and the type of courage that true change
requires.

Years ago, I saw a bit he performed where he talked about rape in a comedic
light before switching to its after affect (stealing another’s humanity).

We are in need of someone with his stones and a commitment to pointing out
that (the slaughter of black bodies) is beyond horrendous.

Where are all the black or white allies in the comedy field who could
highlight this current tragic state?

We don’t need more artists talking. We need more artists with something to
say.

We need artists who are willing to piss people off immediately after making
them laugh.

We need less gratitude and more revolution.

Mr. Pryor could discuss his drug use,fascination with death and his own
destruction and make you think that anything was possible and our ability to
share our humanity was our greatest strength.

I can picture Richard performing at a policemen’s banquet before heading to
the ghetto to perform the same set.

Wouldn’t it be incredible to then bring the groups together for a yuck fest
and then a heartfelt discussion about our assumptions, fascination with
violence, fear, hatred and distrust of the “other”?

Richard I know you are watching these shenanigans and getting a whole lot of
great material.

Do us all a favor and send us a proxy with your love for humanity and
ability to tell the truth.

Pan African Film Festival Day 3

“Bound” Directed by Peres Owino.
Definitely a great documentary worthy of attention for our chapter and the NA .

This is an in depth analysis of opinions of African American’s on Africans and visa versa. These range from the former’s statements on “poor, uneducated, bare foot” to the latter’s statements on “thugs and lazy.”

Parallels are made between African tribal chiefs who cooperated with exporting of their countrymen to the US slave trade, and the enslavemen of other Africans by imported religious evangelicals and colonial powers.

The movie shows some humorous moments when groups of Africans and African Americans expose their stereotypes of each other.

The end of the documentary shows how the knowledge of African Americans as to their roots leads to the concept of “You can only be free if you know who you are and where you are from” This can be emporing as examples ar given where DNA analysis can lead to powerful self discovery.

All in all, a great effort, hopefully it will become available on DVD!

The NA Joins Crowdfunding of New Anti Homophobia Documentary

The NABWMT is providing funding to a UK based videographer Daniel Law to produce a documentary on the homophobia in Uganda. This is in keeping with our support of such work as pioneered by NA Director Kirk Gile and others.
NA Director Pat Carron sent the following to Daniel:

“Dear Daniel,

On behalf of NABWMT, we are pleased to support your documentary on Evangelicals and Uganda’s Anti-Gay law.  Your investigation of Mr. Shinners is very important and quite impressive. Like you, we have been following the influence of evangelical pastors, like Scott Lively, on Uganda for some time now. Thus, we are very happy to contribute to your project and we encourage you to continue on!

As an organization, we have numerous local chapters of Black and White Men Together and Men of All Colors Together across the United States. We have over 11,000 interested people following our Facebook page with discussions about Uganda. Our website (nabwmt.org) has published our statement on African Homophobia, with a reference to evangelicals, their dirty work, and their tax-exempt status. We are a kindred spirit to your efforts.

We would love to interact with you because we have so many questions like:
When will the film be complete and how many minutes will it be?
Have you produced other documentaries before?
Can we assist in promoting your film and efforts here in the U.S.? We would love to screen your film to our members through our national convention and local chapters.
When is your next trip to Uganda?
How will NABWMT be mentioned as a supporter of your project?

I hope we can build a collaborative partnership regarding your project.
We think this work is very crucial!

Respectfully,

Patrick Carron
Board of Directors, NABWMT”

Daniel acknowledged this in his response below 

Daniel Law 

To: 

Mark P. Behar, PA-C 

“Thank you so much for your support and kind donation. I hope to have the film finished by May at the latest, but sooner if I can raise the funds. I currently plan for the documentary to be around the 90 minute mark. This is my first documentary, but I do have a number of experienced filmmakers to turn to for advice where needed. I would be very grateful if you could assist in promoting the film in the U.S and screening it to your members. I hope to return to Uganda for additional filming as soon as possible. Ideally in the next few weeks if I can secure the funds. I will thank your organization in the credits for your support and kind donation.

While there is much publicity regarding US evangelicals like Scott Lively, there are many in the UK who fly under the radar. I plan to show that it is not just pastors from the US spreading this hatred and that this is an international problem. The Charity Commission in the UK had been deemed “not fit for purpose” by MPs and despite numerous complaints has allowed Shinners to retain his tax-free charity status despite a clear breach of their rules. Another UK preacher, Jacqui Green, from the UK just attended Bishop Kiganda’s anti-gay new year’s rally despite me bringing it to her attention in advance and pressure from numerous groups/newspapers. Paul Shinners is again in Africa spreading his dangerous lies and propaganda as we speak.

If you could reach out to your members or affiliated groups in whatever ways you can and ask them to also contribute to this project then it can be completed sooner and hopefully preempt the passage of the new anti-gay bill in Uganda.

Any further help and support would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again,

Daniel”

For Further questions and comments please contact Pat Carron (pjcarron@aol.com)

Oscar Contenders: Gay Hero and Civil Rights Hero

This is the season for Oscar Contenders and I am thrilled to see that “The Imitation Game” and “Selma” are in there.

So, go and see the former movie telling the tale of Alan Turing and his team who broke the German Enigma code and saved millions of lives during World War II. Rather than be recognized as a hero he was persecuted for being gay and chemically castracted, then committed suicide, He was a pioneer in every way and his work led the way to phones and computers. Our LGBT history has been suppressed but we must revive and celebrate it.

And the much acclaimed movie of the civil rights era “Selma” is now in wide release. Criticism of this movie for it’s portrayal of President Johnson as a laggard on civil rights has surfaced. History has to be carefully examined as it is shown in movies. For example, the film “Lincoln” was critizised by historians for ignoring the role African Americans had in their emancipation. However, historians claim that Johnson worked in the background to acheive the Civil Rights and Voting Rights.

Our organization prides itself in telling the whole story behind Black and White, Gay and Straight issues, so these movies help remind that these heroic strugles need everyone to tell theses tales from history.

Source: NY TImes, http://theimitationgamemovie.com

So you are black and a recent college grad!

Recent college graduates are having a tough time.
Although they have survived both the recession and weak recovery far better than those without a degree, blacks who finished four years of college are suffering from unemployment rates that are painfully high compared with their white counterparts. (12.4 % versus 4.9% respectively), 

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There has always been a gap between black and white college grads but this has widened. In 2007, for example, there was only a 1.4% point difference. Also, historically, the periods during and immediately after downturns have been harder on blacks than on whites. But in this current cycle, the trend has been even more extreme.

Younger workers absorbed the brunt of job losses during the Great Recession, and black college graduates, are also subject to persistent racial discrimination despite advances in civil rights, and have suffered from a double disadvantage, the report concluded.

There’s no doubt that having a college education improves the relative situation of any black American compared with any other black American.

Astoundingly, the unemployment rate in 2013 was lower among whites who never finished high school (9%) than it was for blacks with some college education (10.5%). Black graduates are suffering from a version of last hired, first fired, For many recent black graduates, the benefits of a college education haven’t yet lived up to the promise. And the delay in finding a job can reverberate years down the road, reducing wages over a lifetime.

Even degrees in science, technology, engineering and math — so-called STEM fields where the demand is high — have not immunized recent black graduates against job search difficulty. From 2010 to 2012, the average unemployment rate among young black engineers was 10 percent, the center reported, while the underemployment rate was 32 percent.

Clearly, our black and brown bothers are struggling despite the Stock Exchange breaking 18.000 and overall unemployed rate is 5.8%

Sources: New York Times
John Schmitt at the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Privilege, Part 3

It is amazing how cities, not only in the USA but in Europe have streets and buildings built on white proviilege.

So, on may last visit to my home country I was in Bristol with my brother. This English City is a vibrant hub and used to be an important port in earlier days. During the height of the slave trade,
from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slaving ships were fitted out at
Bristol, carrying a (conservatively) estimated half million people from
Africa to the Americas and slavery.[44]  There is a tendency to see slavery as something that happened in
America”. You can’t tell the story of
Britain’s role in abolishing slavery without first engaging with its
long history of participation in the slavery business,

By the 1740’s slavery was beginning to
be seen as an offence against ‘natural lawby a small but
growing section of British society. Others, notably ‘The Society of Friends
(Quakers) took up an anti-slavery stance on religious grounds as early as 1760. Four weeks after the great abolishonist William Wilberforce’s
death in 1833, the Emancipation Act became law and it took effect from 1st August 1834. It
marked the end of the slavery and plantation system.

But still, I was walking around the city and saw “Black Boy Hill” and “Whitelasies Road” So if you are a white woman you must be a lady, but if you are a black man you must be a boy! There is still work to be done.

Sources: References are to Wikipedia